Findings

In order to find out how case management operated in each jurisdiction the telephone interviews and Focus Groups were structured in a matrix.  

Firstly, the "journey" of an offender, from one end of the correctionsl system to the other, was traced.  Secondly, a set of cross-cutting themes was examined.  

The detailed findings (left) are presented in the same structure; they aim to summarise the detail jurisdiction-by-jurisdiction which can found in the System Maps.

ARGUABLY THE MOST SIGNIFICANT FINDING WAS THAT NOWHERE IS CASE MANAGEMENT ORGANISED AND DELIVERED AS A SYSTEM-WIDE FUNCTION
   
THIS MEANS THAT THE POTENTIAL FOR CASE MANAGEMENT TO ENSURE THAT WORK AT EACH STAGE OF THE >CORRECTIONAL SYSTEM BUILDS INCREMENTALLY ON THE LAST IS NOT BEING FULLY REALISED

THE CONSEQUENCE IS DUPLICATION AND WASTE ON A MASSIVE SCALE

At this stage, the findings reflect the knowledge and perspective of the DOMICE correspondants.  Each jurisdiction is, of course, in a continuous state of evolution.

Headlines

Some form of case management can be found at every stage of almost every correctional system in Europe.

It is the core process for individualising correctional work; it is surprising, therefore, that it is so little studied and managed.

Nowhere is it organised and delivered as a single, system-wide function; it is usually stage, provider, sentence or project specific; where particular attention is paid to integrating one stage with another, this is most likely to occur at the transition from custody to supervised release.

Case management is becoming more complex.  There is an increasing focus upon victims and public protection, higher levels of scrutiny and accountability and more technical and technological ways of working. 

Case managers are well qualified, highly motivated and resourceful professionals.  In most places their work is under-resourced.  The outcomes required of them are most often aspirational rather than realistic, implied rather than explicit. 

Case management is focussed too locally to be able to respond well to the challenge of an increasingly mobile offender population.